Storyline 1: Definition of Built-In States

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States enable you to display different views of the same object, each of which can be triggered based on users' interaction with your content. Use any of the built-in states provided by Storyline, or create your own custom states.

Storyline offers built-in states for objects (such as images, shapes, and buttons), for drag and drop interactions, and for illustrated character expressions. Each built-in state is explained below.

Object states

There are several built-in states that can be applied to objects in Storyline:

  • Normal: This is the neutral state for any object. By default, it's also the initial state for any object (i.e., how it looks when it first appears in the published output), although the initial state can be changed.
  • Hover: This is how an object appears when users move their mouse over it. If this state exists for an object, it'll automatically display when users hover over it. In other words, you don't need to create a trigger to invoke a hover state.
  • Down: This is how an object appears while it's being clicked. If this state exists for an object, it'll automatically display when users click it. In other words, you don't need to create a trigger to invoke a down state.
  • Selected: This is how an object appears when it has been clicked. It's generally used to indicate that a user has chosen the object. For example, a check box uses the selected state to provide a visual cue (check mark), indicating that it has been clicked.

    Selected states are often used in conjuction with button sets, so that only one object can be selected at a time.

    If the selected state exists for an object, it'll automatically display when users click it. In other words, you don't need to create a trigger to invoke a selected state.
  • Visited: This is how an object appears after it has been clicked. It's useful when you want to provide users with a visual indicator of the objects they've already clicked (for example, a series of buttons).

    Storyline will remember this state when users revisit the same slide later unless you've configured the slide properties or layer properties to "reset to initial state". Storyline will even remember this state when users exit the course and resume later—unless you've disabled the resume funtionality or they choose not to resume.

    If the visited state exists for an object, it'll automatically display after users click it. In other words, you don't need to create a trigger to invoke a visited state.
  • Disabled: Use this state when you want to disable an object. A disabled object is visible to users, but it won't respond when hovered over, clicked, or dragged. Unless this is the initial state of an object, you'll need to use a trigger to invoke the disabled state.
  • Hidden: This state makes an object invisible. Unless this is the initial state of an object, you'll need to use a trigger to hide an object.

By default, buttons already include most of these states. Here's an example:

You can add built-in states to other objects, too, such as images, shapes, captions, characters, and markers. You can also modify any built-in state (except Hidden). Click here to learn more about adding and editing states.

Drag and drop states

When you're working with drag and drop interactions, you have access to three special built-in states:

  • Drag Over: This is how a drag item looks when it's dragged over a drop target or how a drop target looks when an object is dragged over it. If this state exists for an object, it'll automatically display when users interact with the drag and drop scenario. In other words, you don't need to create a trigger to invoke it.
  • Drop Correct: This is how a drag item looks when it's dropped on the correct target. If you want this state to display after users have submitted the interaction for evaluation, mark the option to "Delay item drop states until interaction is submitted". On the other hand, if you want this state to display immediately (i.e., before users submit the interaction), do not mark the option to "Delay item drop states until interaction is submitted".
  • Drop Incorrect: This is how a drag item looks when it's dropped on an incorrect target. If you want this state to display after users have submitted the interaction for evaluation, mark the option to "Delay item drop states until interaction is submitted". On the other hand, if you want this state to display immediately (i.e., before users submit the interaction), do not mark the option to "Delay item drop states until interaction is submitted".

Click here to learn more about adding and editing states.

Character expressions

Illustrated characters have numerous built-in states for a variety of expressions (or emotions), including:

  • Alarmed
  • Angry
  • Asking
  • Confused
  • Disappointed
  • Happy
  • Neutral
  • Stressed
  • Surprised
  • Talking
  • Thinking
  • Worried

Here's an example of an illustrated character with several built-in states (expressions):

Use the "Change state oftrigger to change a character's expression when a specified event occurs:

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